How to Successfully Deal with Menopausal Anxiety, Panic Attacks and Fatigue

by Tara Harding

The menopause can trigger both anxiety and panic attacks, followed by fatigue. However, there is no need for women to feel helpless as there are some remedies available. This article will shed some light on what to expect when these symptoms occur and how they can be kept at bay.

What triggers your anxiety and panic attacks?

Feeling anxious and low during the menopause can sometimes be due to hormonal changes in your body. Certain significant life-changing events can exacerbate your anxious feelings for example:

  • Children reaching adulthood and leaving home
  • Taking care of elderly parents or relatives who are unwell

If you are feeling anxious without any known direct or indirect cause, the most likely culprit is the menopause or perimenopause. When your ovaries stop producing the hormones oestrogen and progesterone, menopausal symptoms, such as panic attacks and anxiety, can occur.

What are the common symptoms of panic attacks?

  • Faster heartbeat due to an unexpected increase in adrenaline
  • Shortness of breath
  • Dizziness and weakness
  • A tingling sensation in your extremities, such as your hands and feet
  • Sweating and nausea

What should you do during anxiety and panic attacks?

Not everyone reacts the same way when panic sets in. Typically, your heart will start to pump faster and harder. In addition, some women may:

  • Gasp for breath
  • Feel numbness or tingling in their fingers

However, it is important to remember that you won’t pass out during a panic attack because your adrenaline levels will be too high. In fact, you can manage these episodes by focusing your attention on something you can see, hear or smell. This will distract you from the anxiety and panic attack.

Menopausal fatigue

If you have suffered anxiety or a panic attack, extreme fatigue may soon follow. The drop in your oestrogen levels can cause exhaustion, and anxiety and stress will often aggravate this problem. Another contributing factor to menopausal fatigue is low iron levels and a poorly functioning thyroid gland.

Don’t worry if you cannot complete all your tasks in one day. Bear in mind that you are doing the best you can. Menopausal fatigue is not easy to deal with.

Unfortunately, tiredness can hit you at very inconvenient moments; for example, you may be at work when you suddenly feel an urge to lie down and go to sleep. One solution is to avoid taking a mid-afternoon nap on the weekends. Plenty of sleep will not resolve your fatigue problem, and it may even have the opposite effect. Physical activity and a nutritious diet are still the best ways of relieving the symptoms of anxiety, depression and insomnia. Of course, exercise may not be the first thing on your mind when you are feeling tired. Nevertheless, studies have shown that light jogs or long walks are a good way of boosting your energy levels. Fatigue is often the first sign of dehydration so drinking eight glasses of water a day can help keep you hydrated. Research has also shown that if your body loses just 1% of water, your energy levels will go down. At work, it is a good idea to ensure that you always have a bottle of water on hand. Good nutrition is also a vital aspect of maintaining energy levels. Remember, you should eat the right food at regular intervals and try to avoid processed food and drinks. Consider eating five to six small meal servings over the course of a day. This will prevent you from feeling sluggish after a big meal.

Depleting hormones can cause women to feel anxious and fatigued. Fortunately, there are remedies available. Physical activity and a nutritious diet can help you shake off the tired feeling but sleeping for long periods can have a negative effect. When it comes to panic attacks, it is possible to overcome any anxiety by focusing on a single thought.

 

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